Sunday, 19 September 2010

Google sends all sorts of things that make me think

By Susie Mallett
September 2nd 2010


A thought for the autumnal day

My enforced autumnal break is not yet over, but I hope that it is slowly coming to an end.

I just wanted to post this, an alert from Google:

http://www.brighthub.com/education/special/articles/87545.aspx

The sources of information at the end of this article are stated as Wikipedia, March of Dimes and the Smirthwaite furniture suppliers website called "conductive-ed".

I am posting this not because I am desperate for something to write about. I just think that it is interesting because of where I found it and what it is hidden amongst, more exactly what it is part of.

This article on conductive education is written by one Jayant R. Row from India, one of one- hundred-and-thirty-three postings, all but a few of which are about civil engineering, home improvements and project management.

Dotted amongst the information on how to fix a composting toilet and how to spackle a ceiling, there are some articles to read about child development and other human conditions. As well as the article on conductive education there is one on finding employment if suffering from Asperger's syndrome:

http://www.brighthub.com/mental-health/autism-pdd/articles/81560.aspx

There is also one on growing organic carrots, four on emotional development in teenage relationships, one on puberty and another on panic attacks. There are three others about keeping teens busy in their vacations and forming friendships. In total there are some twelve articles that are not about home improvement and engineering.

This made me think that this is where conductive upbringing should be. Not hidden amongst the elements that make up life, but there in amongst everything else that we do in our lives. It must be a small a part of a whole that is inconspicuous in its presence but has its role in making life unified.

This collection of articles by Jayant R Row is unified by the presence of these few articles on human development.

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