Sunday, 8 March 2015

Touch-free smart-phone and tablet use



 
Early spring 2015
I yesterday wrote about the opportunities that I had to read when my mobile phone was in for repair and I also wrote about how I also missed the early morning read of the blogs that I follow.

Today I discovered the link below and I realised how lucky I am to be able to use a smart phone at all.  Not only lucky that I received help from my niece and my nephew to learn what to do with when it was new (I had purposely bought the same model that they both had at the time) and not only lucky to have colleagues who back up that learned knowledge and rescue me when something goes wrong, I am lucky that I can physically use it – there are many people who cannot.

I love watching our most severely disabled children invent their own techniques to use their smart phones and tap out words on their computers. Luckily most of them work out how to use them independently with help from our fine-motor tasks and games. But there are still many people, especially paraplegics, who just cannot manage to use a phone or a tablet alone.

A man in Israel was asked by a disabled man whether he could remedy this. This led to the invention of a touch-free controlled phone that is controlled by using head movements –

1 comment:

Andrew Sutton said...


This passage, Susie, I find most telling –

'I love watching our most severely disabled children invent their own techniques to use their smart phones and tap out words on their computers. Luckily most of them work out how to use them independently with help from our fine-motor tasks and games.'

Again and again I read in your postings (here and on www.susie-mallett.org)nhow both children and adults develop what the jargon calls 'orthofunctional spontaneity' and what in plain English means finding what they themselves want to do and then working out their own best ways how to do it – all for themselves. This I regard as the epitome of what you call 'conductive lifestyle; and the hard won fruit of conductive pedagogy.

This is not of course beyond or after pedagogy, because self-pedagogy continues as here, but a somewhat higher order or phenomenon. Nor is the conductor is necessarily redundant in this process – also as here riding shotgun to ensure that the process continues as smoothly and satisfactorily as possible.

I am sure that many other experienced conductors and their long-term clients could tell the same tale. I wish that more would, so that more people out there, would-be users of conductive services, potential supporters, future academics and researchers, could develop a fuller understanding of what 'the conductive' is all about.

Meanwhile, I am faced as ever with my own lack of a conceptual framework to codify the processes within conductive upbringing and lifestyle. Maybe others have – but if so, then they are keeping it very close to their chests.

I guess that you and tour more experiences colleagues have no immediate need for codification, probably finding enough for practical guidance from your molar or holistic understanding of what you do. But codification might help those just entering the conductor trade, and would certaianly help those looking in from outside but not seeing.

This stage in the conductive process is surely one of its highesst products, and its most powerful means to maintain and progress development. It cannot, however, be 'researched' without a conceptual framework, and I hold out little hope of academic researchers rushing to establish their own. So, no resaearch, and then the usual false logic that there is no research, so it doesn't exist.

Rony Schenker has posited the notion of 'post-conductivism':

https://www.facebook.com/conductive.world/posts/10205903227250071

Perhaps the greatest legacy that the present generation might contribute to such a state is articulated recognition that there is something going on beyond mere conductive pedagogy...